A14

Two genuine ‘concerto’ titans of the orchestral repertoire are presented in this concert, contrasting two of music history’s most impressive composers – the romantic German genius Brahms and the modern Hungarian innovator Bartók. Brahms’ Piano Concerto No. 2 is a massive expanse of grand structure and ravishingly beautiful harmony and melody. Always self-critical, he spent three years working it out, completing the opus in Vienna in 1881. He wrote to his beloved colleague Clara Schumann: "I want to tell you that I have written a very small piano concerto with a very small and pretty scherzo." Of course, what he was describing was the complete opposite of this in terms of scale, and the concerto was a huge success when Brahms himself premiered the work with the Budapest Philharmonic Orchestra in 1881, subsequently performing it in many other European cities. The sublime slow movement has a big cello solo, most probably suggested by the parallel moment in Clara’s own piano concerto. Bartók’s ‘concerto’ is for the entire orchestra, maximising to the full the virtuosic potential of every instrumental section. One of his last and most accessible works, its brilliance is impossible to resist.

A14

Two genuine ‘concerto’ titans of the orchestral repertoire are presented in this concert, contrasting two of music history’s most impressive composers – the romantic German genius Brahms and the modern Hungarian innovator Bartók. Brahms’ Piano Concerto No. 2 is a massive expanse of grand structure and ravishingly beautiful harmony and melody. Always self-critical, he spent three years working it out, completing the opus in Vienna in 1881. He wrote to his beloved colleague Clara Schumann: "I want to tell you that I have written a very small piano concerto with a very small and pretty scherzo." Of course, what he was describing was the complete opposite of this in terms of scale, and the concerto was a huge success when Brahms himself premiered the work with the Budapest Philharmonic Orchestra in 1881, subsequently performing it in many other European cities. The sublime slow movement has a big cello solo, most probably suggested by the parallel moment in Clara’s own piano concerto. Bartók’s ‘concerto’ is for the entire orchestra, maximising to the full the virtuosic potential of every instrumental section. One of his last and most accessible works, its brilliance is impossible to resist.

Date

04 September 2021

Time

7:30 PM

Venue

Thailand Cultural Centre, Main Hall

Orchestra

RBSO

Conductor

Michel Tilkin

Soloist

Irene Russo, Piano

Programme

Johannes Brahms:
Piano Concerto No. 2 in B-flat major, Op. 83
Béla Bartók:
Concerto for Orchestra

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